Author Archive for Amanda



King of the Hill

I unearthed this photo of my father and grandmother recently when going through a box in the attic. I stared at it for so long, wondering at the lost beauty of that moment, revealing the seemingly endless future that lay ahead for my father. I wonder if this was taken the day the family left […]

Pool

It has been some time since I have updated this blog, and with the gray rainy weather it seemed like a perfect time to climb into the attic and rummage around for more of his drawings. This image I find both haunting and serene, as if she is poised between one part of her life […]

Long Ago Portrait

This is a portrait my father did in the early 60s in Frankfurt around the time of my birth. I did not know of its existence until today. This woman’s daughter apparently found me on the internet and emailed me a photo of this painting. You can imagine my surprise.  I really love my father’s […]

My and My Orderly, 1946

I love looking at old photographs of my father, because they often show expressions that were heretofore completely unknown to me. “A smile?” you might ask. “What could be unknown about that?” And I say to you that in the smiles I see from these photographs I see something in him from happier times. I […]

'Til the Boys Get Home

I came across this article about my father’s military service when I was cleaning out the garage today. I thought it was worth posting. I like what he had to say at the end.

Book

Book, originally uploaded by Living in Monrovia. 3 x 5, pencil on paper

Coat Wrinkles

Red Tie, originally uploaded by Living in Monrovia. 3 x 5, pencil with wash

The End of the Beginning

I started this blog with the idea that I would give the world a little of my father’s talent, one that he kept hidden away, and write about him a little, as a way of getting to know him. I have done that; I have started with the ending, an ending I saw coming from […]

CLOSED

CLOSED, originally uploaded by Living in Monrovia. Here is a photo I took of one of the file drawers of my father’s. He obsessively cut out images from magazines and categorized them according to what would make the most sense in terms of a reference for figure drawing. I haven’t counted how many folders he […]